Changing Marriage Attitudes and Mental Health Among Youth:

What Could This Mean for Youth Relationship Education?

By Hailey Palmer and Alan J. Hawkins

The Bottom-Line (at the Top): Recent research has found shifting trends among youth in two important areas: marriage attitudes and mental health. A substantial drop seems to have occurred in the percentage of youth who consider getting married to be important to them personally. Furthermore, researchers are finding large increases in mental health problems, such as depressionand anxiety, among teens. How might these trends affect youth relationship education? Continue reading “Changing Marriage Attitudes and Mental Health Among Youth:”

How or Why Does Relationship Education Work?

A Summary of 6 Years of RE Research

by Hailey Palmer and Alan J. Hawkins

Bottom-Line First: Several factors have been identified by researchers as possible mechanisms for how or why relationship education (RE) works for program participants. However, because none of these factors has been consistently studied, we can’t yet make strong conclusions. Rather, we offer direction for future areas of research. This blog may be of special interest to RE researchers. Continue reading “How or Why Does Relationship Education Work?”

Who Benefits Most from Relationship Education?

A Review of Recent Relationship Education Research

by Hailey Palmer and Alan J. Hawkins

The Bottom-Line First: We conducted an extensive search, digging deep into the last 6 years of research in the relationship education (RE) field to find studies that tested which groups benefit the most from participating in RE programs. We discovered dozens of studies that consistently pointed to distressed, disadvantaged, and racial-ethnic minority groups benefitting more than other groups. Continue reading “Who Benefits Most from Relationship Education?”

For the Children: Does Couple and Relationship Education Influence Child Well-Being Through Enhanced Couple Functioning?

by Hailey Palmer

The Bottom-Line First: The Supporting Father Involvement program is a co-parenting, preventative intervention aimed at strengthening the couple relationship and increasing the quantity and quality of fathers’ involvement. An evaluation study published just last month reported that the Supporting Father Involvement program reduces couple conflict and by so doing leads to less harsh parenting which leads to fewer child behavior problems. Continue reading “For the Children: Does Couple and Relationship Education Influence Child Well-Being Through Enhanced Couple Functioning?”