Premarital Relationship Education and Its Effect on Newlywed Help-Seeking

by Jennifer Griffith

The Bottom-line First. One of the most important benefits of premarital education may be its ability to increase spouses’ willingness to seek help down the road for the inevitable problems of early married life, and to seek help sooner and at lower levels of distress. Marriage therapists are cheering the findings of a recent study documenting these important benefits of premarital education. Continue reading “Premarital Relationship Education and Its Effect on Newlywed Help-Seeking”

Buffering the Effects of Stress on Health through Relationship Education: The Important Role of Improving Relationship Confidence

by Alan J. Hawkins

The Bottom-line First: Relationship education programs that help couples disconnect stresses in their lives, like financial hardship, from their relationships build confidence in the future of their relationship. In turn, this improves their reports of physical health. Continue reading “Buffering the Effects of Stress on Health through Relationship Education: The Important Role of Improving Relationship Confidence”

Relationship Education Can Reduce the Effects of Anger/Stress on Marital Conflict

by Alan J. Hawkins

The Bottom-line First: Relationship education program designers have long thought that it was important to help couples better understand and recognize their daily stresses and moods and then give them tools to prevent stresses and negative moods from igniting conflicts or turning small-disagreement mole hills into relationship-harming mountains. An important, recent study with lower income couples now documents that participation in RE can reduce the tendency for stresses and negative moods to turn disagreements into severe conflicts. Continue reading “Relationship Education Can Reduce the Effects of Anger/Stress on Marital Conflict”

“Survey Says”… The Effectiveness of Program Satisfaction and Learning Questionnaires at Predicting Later Marital Quality

by Jennifer Griffith

The Bottom-line First: If program administrators don’t have the resources to do a rigorous, long-term evaluation of the impact of their relationship education programs, what other options do they have to document program effectiveness? As it turns out, recent research suggests that simple post-program surveys of participants’ reports of learning and intent to change are pretty good predictors of relationship outcomes down the road. Continue reading ““Survey Says”… The Effectiveness of Program Satisfaction and Learning Questionnaires at Predicting Later Marital Quality”